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Aldermen targeted on clean power

With next year’s elections looming, national officers of the Sierra Club and Greenpeace are coming to town to announce additional organizational resources for a ward-by-ward drive to win aldermanic support for the Chicago Clean Power Ordinance.

They’ll join representatives from nearly 50 environmental and civic groups in the Chicago Clean Power Coalition at a media event tomorrow (Thursday, July 15) at 11 a.m. at Dvorak Park, 1119 W. Cullerton.

The park is nearby Midwest Generation’s Fisk plant, one of two coal-fired power plants in the city that would be required to install modern pollution controls under the ordinance.  The two plants are held responsible for asthma and other health problems causing scores of deaths and hundreds of emergency room visits every year.

The ward-level, citywide campaign will include a focus on Aldermen Danny Solis (25th ward) and Rick Munoz (22nd ward), who represent Pilsen and Little Village, where the Fisk and Crawford plants are located.  To date, nine aldermen have joined sponsor Ald. Joe Moore (49th) in backing the ordinance; Solis and Munoz have yet to do so.

While the company has said it is reducing harmful emissions from the plants, Becki Clayborn of the Sierra Club’s Illinois  Beyond Coal Campaign pointed out that the US EPA and Illinois Attorney General brought them to court earlier this year because they are failing to meet current standards for emissions.  The plants have been charged with thousands of violations of opacity standards.

In 2006 the state negotiated a deal allowing the plants to continue operating but requiring them to meet modern emissions standards — starting in 2015.  Because they predate the Clean Air Act of 1977, they are exempt from its toughest standards.

Commonwealth Edison recently told Crain’s Chicago Business that within the next few years, the loss of either Fisk or Crawford “would create an unacceptable degredation of reliability in downtown Chicago.”

Clayborn is skeptical.  “We think that’s just speculation,” she saqid.  “We know [Fisk and Crawford] are only operating at 30 percent capacity on average, so they’re not creating that much power.”

They are creating about 5 million tons of carbon emissions yearly – the equivalent of 875,000 automobiles, according to the coalition.

“Burning coal to generate electrictity harms human health and compounds many of the major public health problems facing the industrialized world,” according to a recent report from Physicians for Social Responsibility.

The report traces detrimental health effects from every phase of the coal power business – from mining to disposal of post-combustion wastes.  Coal power production contributes to four of the five leading causes of death in the U.S. – heart disease, cancer, stroke and chronic respiratory disease.

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Category: coal, energy, environment, Little Village, Pilsen

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One Response

  1. […] grassroots campaign to win aldermanic support for the Chicago Clean Power Ordinance had its first victory yesterday […]


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