Send tips to Community Media Worskhop
cmw@newstips.org
NEWSTIPS HOME | About | Follow on Twitter @ChicagoNewstips


Organizing against violence

As Chicago reeled under a new spate of street violence, community organizers including scores of teens working to prevent violence met Saturday in Little Village — and participants said the problem will require a far more comprehensive approach than just locking up “bad guys.”

“The ‘harsh on crime’ approach simply hasn’t worked,”  said Luis Carrizales, coordinator of the Violence Prevention Collaborative, a collective of community organizations run out of Enlace Chicago.

“We’ve had that attitude for 15 years, and we’ve created a prison population larger than ever in history.  And we have more young people who are disconnected, either not in school or out of work, and we’re surprised that they turn to violence.”

The collaborative works on the principle that the problem of violence is complex and there is no single approach to dealing with it, Carrizales said.  For example, a panel at Saturday’s gathering addressed the links between street violence and domestic violence — young people who have witnessed or been direct victims of abuse and haven’t gotten treatment.

Peace circles

The event marked the UN’s Day of Peace and focused on nonviolence education.  Peace circle training was offered for teachers and school counselors, part of an effort to promote restorative justice in Chicago schools, Carrizales said.

It’s one of several key proactive strategies to reduce violence that political leaders and school officials should take more seriously, he said.

The “school-to-prison pipeline” — with school disciplinary policies that criminalize misbehavior that would have been dealt with within school in earlier days — has certainly contributed to the culture of violence, he said.

“You’re convicting and labelling people as violent and unredeemable at age 14, 15, 16, and saying lock them up and get rid of them,” he said.  “The problem is they’re going to be coming back to our neighborhoods, and they’ll come back bitter and more angry and with even less options.”

Read the rest of this entry »

SW Side community bank is resurrected

While hundreds of community banks were taken over by larger institutions following the recent financial crash, an historic small bank that has served immigrants on the Southwest Side is bucking that trend — it’s being resurrected (as it were) as a community-based institution.

The Resurrection Project and the Self-Help Credit Union will celebrate what they’re calling  the re-opening of Second Federal Credit Union on Saturday, September 21, with a press conference at 10 a.m. and cultural program at 11 a.m. at 3960 W. 26th.

That’s the location of the main office of Second Federal Savings and Loan, which opened in 1923.  As the needs of its immigrant clientele changed over the years, Second Federal pioneered making loans to undocumented immigrants who lacked Social Security numbers.  Like many institutions, it was weakened as home values dropped for properties on which it held mortgages.

Last year the FDIC closed Second Federal, rejecting a bid for the bank’s assets and loans by TRP and Self-Help, and sold its  three branches and $176 million in deposits to Rosemont-based Wintrust Financial Corp, which has been actively acquiring failing banks in the area.

At the time, U.S. Representative Luis Gutierrez slammed the FDIC’s decision, saying it needlessly placed hundreds of Latino homeowners at risk of foreclosure.

Read the rest of this entry »

Poverty rising in Chicago

Nearly 1 in 4 Chicagoans, totalling over 636,000 people, lived below the federal poverty level in last year, according to the Census Bureau’s newly released community survey — indicating an anemic recovery and city economic development policies which have failed to target living-wage jobs for neighborhood residents.

The number represents an increase of over 6,500 Chicagoans in poverty over last year’s survey.

The Illinois Hunger Coalition cited the figures to argue that Congress should reject cuts to nutrition assistance now under consideration in the House of Representatives.

“Hunger and poverty rates spiked at the beginning of the recession and have stayed high ever since,” said Diane Doherty of IHC.  “Given the economic struggles that continue to persist in this state, it is outrageous that Congress is even debating cuts to SNAP,” said Diane Doherty of IHC.

Read the rest of this entry »

Illinois considers GMO labelling

Supporters and opponents of state legislation to require labelling of genetically-engineered food will testify Tuesday at a State Senate subcommittee hearing in Chicago.

The subcommittee on food labelling will consider SB 1666, sponsored by subcommittee chair David Koehler (D-Springfield), on Tuesday, September 17 at 10:30 a.m. in Room C 600 of the Bilandic Building, 160 N. LaSalle.

Testifying in support of Koehler’s bill will be Michael Hansen, senior staff scientist of Consumers Union; Patty Lovera, assistant director of Food and Water Watch; and UIC professors Ann Reisner and William Kling.

Opinion polls show popular support for labelling of genetically-engineered foods in the range of 90 percent.  Fifty developed nations require labelling, including every European Union member.  Connecticut and Maine also require it, and 26 other states are currently considering similar measures.

Two previous hearing showed strong support for the measure downstate, said Emily Carroll of Food and Water Watch.  She said farmers in Central Illinois complain of sharply increased herbicide usage, necessary to address “superweeds” which have developed resistance to herbicides which GE crops are bred to withstand.

“We’re seeing a huge ‘superweed’ problem” as biotech companies respond to “pesticides that are no longer working” by “wratcheting up the toxicity level” — including the recent promotion of 2,4-D, an Agent Orange component — said Emily Carroll, a local organizer for FWW.   Some of these herbicides have demonstrated human health risks, she said.

Opponents of the bill argue that it would raise food costs and give them impression that genetically-engineered foods are unsafe.

Read the rest of this entry »

CHA falls further behind

Under Mayor Emanuel, CHA production of replacement housing has slowed to a near halt — to the point that it’s virtually impossible to see the agency completing its new Plan Forward goals on time, housing advocates say.

And that’s with a five-year extension to CHA’s original ten-year Plan For Transformation.

The numbers are striking:  in each of the last four years under Mayor Daley, CHA produced between 760 and 880 replacement units.

In 2011, under Emanuel, CHA produced 424 units; the next year, 112 units; and in 2013, just 88.

And in its proposed plan for 2014, which was the subject of a public hearing Wednesday, CHA is proposing a grand total of 40 new public housing units.

In fact, that number includes 12 units at the new Dorchester Artists Housing located in a vacant scattered site that was rehabbed in 2005  — and already counted once toward the PFT’s goal of 25,000 replacement units, said Leah Levinger of Chicago Housing Initiative.

Read the rest of this entry »

SE Side wants to benefit from USX development

With nearly $100 million in TIF funds being spent on the first phase of a massive development on the south lakefront, a community summit on Saturday will discuss strategies to win a community benefits agreement for the project.

The Coalition for a Lakeside CBA meets Saturday, September 7, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church, 3200 E. 91st.

Jennifer Epps-Addison of the Partnership for Working Families will discuss how community benefits agreements (CBAs) across the country have won opportunities for local workers and communities, and Tom Tresser of CivicLab will present an analysis of all TIFs in three local wards.

The Coalition will also release results of a new survey of Southeast Side residents.

Site developer McCaffrey Interests has been granted $96 million in TIF support from the city for the first phase of a vast new redevelopment of the former site of US Steel’s South Works (USX) plant, dubbed Chicago Lakeside.  Ultimately McCaffrey plans over 13,000 units of housing, 17.5 million square feet of retail, 125 acres of parks and a 1,500-slip marina.

The TIF subsidy will cover one-fourth of development costs for the first phase of the project, which will include 1 million square feet of retail and restaurants and 848 units of housing.  The first phase is planned for the northwest corner of the 530-acre site, which runs south from 79th Street along the lakefront to the Calumet River.

Concerns about displacement

A major concern is that development could cause displacement in the adjoining area, as it has in other communities, with property tax increases as home values rise forcing longtime residents to leave, said Amelia NietoGomez of the Alliance of the South East, an organizer of the coalition.

Read the rest of this entry »

At Altgeld, CHA scales back demolition plans

With a federal historic preservation review of plans for Altgeld Gardens under way, CHA has dramatically scaled back the number of units it is considering demolishing there, according to a residents group.

People for Community Recovery discovered last year that the CHA development had been found to be eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993, said board president Christian Strachan.

After the group contacted federal agencies for more information — and with demands for a community-led planning process — HUD initiated a Section 106 review aimed at minimizing the impact of federally-funded redevelopment on historic properties, he said.

Meanwhile a consultant hired by CHA in May to coordinate planning has discussed two possible scenarios, one involving demolition of about 120 units and one with even less demolition, according to Cheryl Johnson, executive director of PCR.

That’s a huge change from CHA’s proposal last year, when its annual budget included $7.3 million to cover “planning for demolition” for 648 units at Altgeld, or one-third of the units there.

“That’s a victory for us,” Strachan said.

Read the rest of this entry »

Peace groups react to Syria crisis

Peace groups are launching a petition drive — calling on members of Congress to vote against authorizing military action against Syria — with a rally at Representative Jan Schakowsky’s office, 5533 N. Broadway, on Wednesday, September 4, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

“U.S. military intervention is far more likely to make matters worse, not better,” argues an online petition from the Illinois Coalition for Justice, Peace and the Environment.

Schakowsky joined local representatives Danny Davis and Bobby Rush last week in signing a letter initiated by Rep. Barbara Lee of California calling on President Obama to seek congressional approval for any action, which he has since decided to do.  But yesterday Schakowsky’s husband, political consultant Robert Creamer, posted a “progressive case” for authorizing military action on Huffington Post.

Those responsible for chemical attacks should be prosecuted in the International Criminal Court, and the U.S. should maintain humanitarian aid for refugees and step up diplomatic pressure for a negotiated settlement to the two-year conflict in Syria, said Marcia Bernsten of Chicago Area Peace Action, one of the groups organizing the Wednesday rally.

“Using chemical weapons is completely atrocious, but we don’t have the facts, and even when we do, it’s not the job of the U.S. to punish the perpetrators, it’s the international courts,” she said.  Not only has there been no attack on the U.S., she argued, but the risk of attacks on the U.S. increases “if we go around bombing people.”

She cited a statement from former president Jimmy Carter pointing out that “a punitive military response without a U.N. Security Council mandate…would be illegal under international law” and “will only harden existing positions and postpone a sorely-needed political process to put an end to the catastrophic violence.”

An attack would also risk extensive civilian casualities, would further destablize the region and potentially provoke retaliation by Syria or its allies, Bernsten said.

The American Friends Service Committee is also urging people to contact Congress and ask for a “no” vote on military authorization, said Mary Zerkel.

“While we unequivocally condemn any use of chemical weapons along with continued indiscriminate killing of civilians and other violations of international humanitarian law, military strikes are not the answer,” the group said in a letter to President Obama signed by 26 national organizations.

“Rather than bringing an end to the violence that has already cost more than 100,000 lives, they threaten to widen the vicious civil war in Syria and undermine prospects to de-escalate the conflict and eventually reach a negotiated settlement.”

Read the rest of this entry »



Get Newstips in Your Inbox!

Enter your email address:


Subscribe in a reader

Newstips Archives

Categories

Add to Technorati Favorites

RSS Nonprofit Communicator

  • An error has occurred, which probably means the feed is down. Try again later.

RSS Chicago is the World

  • Telling people’s stories, an ethnic media success September 2, 2015
        By Stephen Franklin Community Media Workshop   A 3-year-old child died on a plane from Chicago to Poland. This, Magdalena Pantelis instantly knew, was a story her readers would care about. But she needed more detail to write about it for the Polish Daily News, the nation’s oldest daily newspaper in Polish, founded Jan. […]
*

*

*



*










CAN TV is a network that belongs to the people of Chicago.  For updates on local programs, and live, timely coverage of community events, sign up at http://www.cantv.org